Fugue

This oddly satisfying short item is from Optical Arts:

“The film is a set of exactly repeated actions, but each time using different objects. It uses the structure of the fugue to create the films narrative, playing on the fugues characteristic of stating the subject in different voices.

“Fugue in A major by Dmitri Shostakovich is a very interesting piece as it contains no harmonic dissonance at all. The Fugue was an outlier in a larger collection of Preludes and Fugues which at the time was panned by critics for being very harsh and dissonant.

“The piece was written in 1950’s Russia under Stalin’s regime and might have been a veiled criticism where any less subtle forms of criticism could have been very dangerous. Shostakovich had already been denounced for political incorrectness in 1948 by the communist party chairman, Andrei Zhdanov and lived under a persistent fear of the numerous purges that were taking place across Russia at that time.

“The piece is performed by Sviatoslav Ricther in 1956 in Prague.”

“The Ballad of Holland Island House”

You know I’m not hip. How many times have I told you that I’m not hip. I’m not hip. That’s why it took six years for me to discover this lovely, soulful animation by Lynn Tomlinson. And you can find more like it at Lynn Tomlinson’s Vimeo channel.

“The Ballad of Holland Island House is a short animation made with an innovative clay-painting technique in which a thin layer of oil-based clay comes to vibrant life frame by frame. Animator Lynn Tomlinson tells the true story of the last house on a sinking island in the Chesapeake Bay. Told from the house’s point of view, this film is a soulful and haunting view of the impact of sea-level rise.”

Earth as Art

The United States Geological Service (USGS) has come out with its latest video of Earth, imaged from space, presented as art. It really is an incredible series of beautiful images. It is, however, just that: a slide show with a music soundtrack. It proceeds too quickly to properly appreciate any of the images or even to finish reading the accompanying text. There are many images, however.

SUGGESTION: watch it the first time straight through, hands off the pause button. Full screen and headphones are highly recommended; altered state is optional. Then watch it the second time with the sound muted and your finger on the pause button.

“The Earth As Art project began in the early 2000s, and its original intent remains the same: to produce images that do not look like satellite images at first glance.

“Earth As Art shows not only what satellites capture in the visible wavelengths of light you and I can see, but also what’s hiding in the invisible wavelengths that Landsat sensors can detect in the infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Those combinations can bring out much more scientific value, but also can produce imagery of breathtaking beauty.”

Earth as Art 3 can be found HERE.

Earth as Art 2 can be found HERE.

Earth as Art 1 can be found HERE.